Recently, there has been increasing medical evidence that suggests that women should not use talcum powder as an intimate hygiene substance because of its links to ovarian cancer.

As early as 1971, scientists suggested that there may be a connection with using talcum powder as a hygienic cleanser.  Researchers believed that talc particles could enter the reproductive tract and travel to the ovaries.  Additional studies have found a link connecting the powder with ovarian cancer as a cause and effect relationship.

The most recent study was completed in June 2013 published by the Cancer Prevention Research by reviewing data from previous research papers involving a sample of 2,000 women.  The results showed an increased risk of ovarian cancer between 20 to 30 percent for women who use talcum powder for intimate personal hygiene.

In May 2016, a jury rendered a verdict for a 62 year-old South Dakota woman for $55 million.  In February 2016, a jury rendered $72 million verdict for a family of a woman who died from ovarian cancer.  In both cases, plaintiffs alleged that defendant Johnson & Johnson’s product “Shower-to-Shower” caused the ovarian cancer in these women.